Learn How to Animate With ‘The LEGO Animation Book’

Image: No Starch Press
Image: No Starch Press

Ever since the release of The LEGO Movie, I’ve wondered how I could create my own stop-motion videos with my ever-growing LEGO collection. Thanks to the genius minds of David Pagano and David Pickett, I had the opportunity to learn with The LEGO Animation Book. While reading the (extremely) thorough content, I came up with more ideas than I could realistically put into action.

Chapters walk the reader through everything from the anatomy of a mini-figure to post-production for your animation. There’s a surprising amount of technical information for every aspect from light to mini-fig joints, so prepare for a a lot of content. Thankfully, it’s all written under the assumption that you’ve no idea what they’re talking about.

Along the way, I learned some big lessons that are easy to share:

  • Animating can require a little or a lot of time, depending on how technical you want to get.
  • You sit in one place for a long time, so get a comfy seat!
  • It’s easy to obsess.
  • Taking the correct number of pictures for each scene can be difficult.
  • It’s better to take too many pictures and not need them all. It’s SUPER hard to re-create a scene you’ve already retired.
  • Tape is magic. Glue is gold.
  • Any given piece can do about a billion different things, so experimenting is important.

After my desk was a studio for far longer than my wife was happy with, I had taken all the pictures. I explored a bunch of animation theories as I put my story together. Using the great instructions from the book, I was able to add some post-production effects in and eventually compile a short animation. I hope you enjoy:

The best bit is that The LEGO Animation Book is available on Amazon, and you can get it in plenty of time before Christmas!

Rory is a newly appointed stepparent to two awesome geeklings. He also writes for mental health awareness at Terminally Intelligent.