Prepare to Conquer Eternia With the Hordak Sixth-Scale Figure From Mondo

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While they may not be as prolific as Hong Kong’s Hot Toys, Mondo has been producing a number of high-quality sixth-scale figures based on different licenses. I’ve previously looked at Catwoman from Batman the Animated Series, as well as the Gill-man from Universal’s Creature From the Black Lagoon. Mondo began their Masters of the Universe sixth-scale line in 2018 with, appropriately enough, He-Man. Their latest figure in the line is Hordak, the evil mentor of He-Man’s nemesis Skeletor.

Mondo sent me their Standard version of the figure, which retails for $230. There is also a Limited Edition for $240, which includes a number of accessories that hearken back to the original Hordak figure from Mattel. Finally, there is also the $250 Classic Variant, which features an alternate head scheme and paint job more reminiscent of the cartoon, as well as including an exclusive Imp figure.

The Hordak sixth-scale figure is designed by Emiliano Santalucia and sculpted by Matt Black, with paint by Hector Arce and Mara Ancheta. Packaging Illustration is by Florian Bertmer, with packaging design by Brent Ashe.

Packaging

The figure arrived in a standard cardboard sixth-scale mailer box. Opening it up, I was delighted to find a strikingly illustrated wraparound slipcover over the figure’s box:

One side of the slipcover. Image by Paul Benson.

The slipcover’s art continues a full 360 degrees. Here is the other side:

The back of the slipcover… or possibly the front? Image by Paul Benson.

Sliding off the slipcover reveals the figure’s box. Here’s the front, featuring a monochrome illustration of Hordak, as well as the Masters of the Universe logo and character name in the classic logo from the series:

The front of the Hordak box. Image by Paul Benson.

The back of the box shows the illustration from the front, but in full color and complete:

The full illustration of Hordak and his Evil Horde. Image by Paul Benson.

As you can see, the full illustration shows not only Hordak but also his Horde. The art style, much like the figure itself, is a cross between the classic style of the He-Man and the Masters of the Universe cartoon and modern comic book realism.

Opening the magnetic hinge on the case reveals a window into the figure itself. A sheet of tissue paper protects the plastic window.

Opening the front flap of the case. Image by Paul Benson.

On the inside of the flap is a description of Hordak himself.

Who is Hordak? Image by Paul Benson.

Opening up the box at the top, there are two stacked plastic trays for the figure, as well as separate plastic bags containing Hordak’s cape and the figure’s base.

The main tray, cape, and base. Image by Paul Benson.

The top tray is the figure of Hordak, along with 3 additional pairs of alternate hands. The bottom tray is Hordak’s staff and crossbow, as well as the other half of the figure stand.

The bottom tray with Hordak’s weapons. Image by Paul Benson.

The figure of Hordak comes very well protected. There are soft plastic sheets that wrap both the upper and lower torso, as well as individual plastic sleeves for the arms.

Hordak with his top layer of protective plastic removed. Image by Paul Benson.

Hordak lies loosely but securely in the plastic, with no twist ties holding him down as you find in some figures like The Creature From the Black Lagoon. Taking Hordak out of the package, you’ll find a piece of foam nestled between head and cowl, to protect the paint:

Cushioning for transport. Image by Paul Benson.

The fins on his forearms also come with little card coverings to protect them:

Hordak’s left arm, with and without the protective covering. Image by Paul Benson.

Hordak

Hordak in all of his glory. Image by Paul Benson.

Hordak comes with a fairly standard sixth-scale figure base. The only thing notable about it is the stylized “M” on the bottom of the base, which I assume stands for “Masters.” As this is my first figure in this line, I can’t say for sure, but I’d bet good money that all of the Mondo MOTU figures have the same base.

The bottom of Hordak’s base. Image by Paul Benson.

The fabric cape, having been rolled up in a bag, could probably use a little careful ironing before displaying the figure. At the top are rings attached to short chains, which easily slip over a couple of spikes near Hordak’s collar.

Hordak’s cape. Image by Paul Benson.

The cape is of decent weight, as it is two different fabrics sewn together. The exterior is a rough cloth, while the interior is satin.

The two materials of the cape. Image by Paul Benson.

The standard version of Hordak doesn’t come with a ton of accessories, but those few that he comes with are very nice. I wish that the iconic hand blaster was also included, but that can be found in both the Limited and Classic Variant versions of the figure.

Hordak’s staff and crossbow. Image by Paul Benson.

The detail on the staff is phenomenal. Here’s a closer look at the headpiece, so you can appreciate the sculpting and paint:

A look at the phenomenal detail of the staff. Image by Paul Benson.

And here’s a better look at the bat-themed crossbow. It isn’t quite as striking as the staff, but it’s still a fabulous piece:

Hordak’s crossbow, with actual string. Image by Paul Benson.

All versions of Hordak come with 4 pairs of interchangeable hands, to allow you to pose him in a variety of ways. The hands aren’t rigid, so you can move the fingers to grip the crossbow and staff.

The loose pairs of hands Hordak come with (fists ship attached to figure). Image by Paul Benson.

The hands are easy to pull out from Hordak’s wrist, and I never had any worry I might break the posts while changing them.

The Verdict

This chonky bat-themed beast weighs in at 5 pounds and feels very solid and substantial in one’s hands. I love the stylistic choice that Mondo went with for the MOTU figures. The musculature is still exaggerated, but unlike the classic Mattel figures, the proportions are much more realistic. In Mondo’s Eternia, everyone is hitting the gym hard and getting shredded.

The paintwork and sculpting are fantastic and speak to the love of these characters. Like what Marvel Studios has done with their characters, the designers at Mondo have taken the classic looks from Masters of the Universe and interpreted them in a way that is highly detailed and modern but still instantly recognizable. With Hordak, the bat theme carries over everywhere on him, even down to the bat wings on his boots.

A closer look at Hordak’s feet and legs. Image by Paul Benson.

I have only a few small quibbles with the figure. Like with other Mondo figures, the figure stand is rather drab. I’d love to see some texture to the base and a nameplate. Also, while the fabric of the cape is very nice, it would have been fantastic if wiring had been sewn in to allow for posing. But really, these are small complaints when looking at Hordak overall.

Hordak is the most impressive sixth-scale figure that I’ve looked at so far from Mondo. The joints are moveable but tight and will hold any of the poses you want to put him in. He’s a gorgeous piece and actually makes me a bit sad that I’m just coming to the Mondo Masters of the Universe line now, having missed earlier figures like He-Man and Skeletor. Still, as any fan knows, there are plenty more characters in Eternia… and, hopefully, Mondo will bring each of them to sixth-scale form.

All versions of Hordak are sold out on the Mondo webstore, but you can still find the Standard version for preorder on Amazon and at Sideshow Collectibles.

Note: Mondo sent me Hordak to evaluate, but had no say in this review. I am also an Amazon affiliate and may earn a small commission on purchases made through their site.

Hi, my name is Hordak. May I tell you about my evil plan? Image by Paul Benson.
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