OGIO Manhattan Bag Review

Ogio Brooklyn Bag  Image: Dakster Sullivan
Ogio Brooklyn Bag Image: Dakster Sullivan

Bags are one of my geeky pleasures. Lately, I’ve been checking out the Ogio: Brooklyn. It’s a simple messenger bag and, thanks to my geeky button collection, I was able to give a little bit of a face lift. Underneath the Superman, Flash and Batman buttons is actually three regular buttons that once you undo, lets you access a hidden pocket under the flap.

The bag has two large main compartments pockets, two inside zippered pockets and a hidden one under the flap on the front. One of the inside zippered pockets is padded to hold either an iPad or other similar sized device (8.5″h x 11.75″w). The strap is a little wider than what I’m use to, but it’s still comfortable as an over the shoulder as well as messenger style. There’s plenty of room on it for buttons, patches or other personalizing you may wish to do.

The inside is pretty roomy and comfortably holds my Kindle Fire (new seven-inch HD), iPad 3 and two marvel graphic novels. Even with the weight that my two devices and two books put on it, I felt the strap could handle it. I’ve had bags in the past where the straps would start to wear down under the same conditions.

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The bottom of the bag is a little padded to keep any electronics you place inside safe. This is very important to me because I never go anywhere without my iPad and my Kindle Fire.

The Brooklyn is available in five different colors including what I like to call “April O’Neal yellow”.

You can purchase the Ogio: Brooklyn on Amazon or directly from Ogio’s website and is available in five different colors.

In exchange for my time and efforts in  reporting my opinion within this blog, I received a free review sample. Even though I receive this benefit, I always give an opinion that is 100% mine.

 

Dakster Sullivan is a network administrator by day and a cosplayer by night. She loves discovering new books to read, tech to play with, and ways to express her herself. She has anxiety and depression and strives to educate others about these invisible illnesses.