DIY Lego Ornaments

In our house, the annual holiday tradition is to make ornaments for all the family members. Every year, I scour Pinterest and various websites to find an age appropriate ornament craft that we can do quickly, without a lot of trauma to the stubborn child’s sense of free will. This year, inspired by Chris McVeigh’s ornament tutorials, I decided to design something that would be easier to find pieces for and easier for my six-year-old to build.

Since we have a Lego store nearby, we have the opportunity to specifically buy the pieces we needed. When looking for pieces, I tried to find ones that would be easy to find if you, like I, have a house filled with random tubs of Lego. If I had prepared more, I would have been able to locate the pieces needed just by sorting through our current gigantic plastic tubs of used and abandoned Lego.

Without further ado, I give you “The Lego Ornament Tutorial in Pictures”:

  1. Assemble the needed pieces. You will need:
  • 6: 4×4 plates
  • 8: Attachment pieces that have corners. I used 2×2 by 2x1s (see picture below)
  • 1: “handle” piece
  • Assorted smaller pieces
Courtest Karen Walsh
Courtesy Karen Walsh

2. Next, start by separating your pieces as follows:

Courtesy Karen Walsh
Courtesy Karen Walsh

3. Take each green plate and assemble them as such:

Courtesy Karen Walsh
Courtesy Karen Walsh
Courtesy Karen Walsh
Courtesy Karen Walsh

Keep going until you have this:

Courtesy Karen Walsh
Courtesy Karen Walsh

4. Once you have assembled the four plates with their attaching pieces. Start placing them on another green plate that has not yet been used.

Courtesy Karen Walsh
Courtesy Karen Walsh

And keep going:

Courtesy Karen Walsh
Courtesy Karen Walsh

And going.

 

Courtesy Karen Walsh
Courtesy Karen Walsh

And going.

Courtesy Karen Walsh
Courtesy Karen Walsh

5. Now that you have an open “box” you need to put a lid on it. This is the tricky part. My suggestion, after multiple attempts that then collapsed the box as a whole, would be to gently place the side of your top plate on one of the 2×1 pieces, then gently rotate and keep placing the plate 2×1 piece at a time along the edge. This will allow you to line up the edges without putting too much pressure on the top. Also, the corners of the black pieces do not touch each other when they are affixed so if you keep in mind that a teeny amount of space is there, it will help with the lid addition of the project. Also, this is the part of the project that, if you’re doing it with a smaller child, is useful to have an adult do.

Courtesy Karen Walsh
Courtesy Karen Walsh

See how you sort of put the one side on at an angle, instead of just plopping it flat on the top? That’s what I was talking about above.

Courtesy Karen Walsh
Courtesy Karen Walsh

6. Take the little handle piece that we’ve assembled and add it on. This is what you will put a string on to hang it on the tree.

Courtesy Karen Walsh
Courtesy Karen Walsh

7. Take a bunch of 1-peggers, cheese wedges, and other small pieces and let your kid (or you!) decorate away!

Courtesy Karen Walsh
Courtesy Karen Walsh
Courtesy Karen Walsh
Courtesy Karen Walsh
Courtesy Karen Walsh
Courtesy Karen Walsh

8. Hang on tree and gaze lovingly at your new ornament!

Courtesy Karen Walsh
Courtesy Karen Walsh

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Karen Walsh is a part time, extended contract, first year writing instructor at the University of Hartford. In other words, she's SuperAdjunct, complete with capes and Jedi robe worn during grading. She also works as a contract internal regulatory compliance auditor for banks. In addition, she writes comics and artist reviews at www.cosplayconnectuniversity.com.She works in order to support knitting, comics, tattoo, and museum membership addictions. She has one dog, one husband, and one son who all live with her just outside of Hartford, CT.