Folding A Galaxy Far, Far Away With Star Wars Origami

A true master of The Force can fold her own lightsaber. Of course, it would help if she had instructions and pre-printed paper like those in Star Wars Origami: 36 Amazing Paper-folding Projects from a Galaxy Far, Far Away.

Star Wars Origami is a paper-folding adventure and Star Wars education folded up into one book. The projects are ranked in difficulty from Youngling to Padawan to Jedi Knight to Jedi Master. For those unfamiliar with origami, the book begins by describing folding terms and showing how they’re made. For those unfamiliar with Star Wars (but somehow found themselves with this book), each project begins with a bit about the object or character being made. The foreword is written by Tom Angleberger, the author of The Strange Case of Origami Yoda and its sequels, Darth Paper Strikes Back and The Secret of the Fortune Wookiee.

The back pages of the book are pre-printed papers that make your folded ball actually look like a Death Star and your five-sided box look like Han Solo in carbonite. Not only that, there are multiple copies of each page so that when your first Boba Fett is a Boba Flop, you can try again.

The author, Chris Alexander, is the founder of StarWarsOrigami.com. He’s been folding paper creations since he was very young and had been building his own Star Wars origami designs for some time before creating the book. If you were at Comic Con this year, you may have seen him there teaching some of the creations featured in it. The instructions for some of them, like the Millennium Falcon are available on his website. But again, those custom papers really make the creation. Here you can look at the difference between a Trade Federation battleship out of gray paper versus the printed papers.

Star Wars Origami has been highly popular with my own younglings, who ask over and over to make more origami pieces. Fortunately there’s enough projects and enough paper to last us for quite some time.

I received a copy of this book for review.

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By day, Ruth works to make open source software communities better. The rest of the time, she makes things, which means her husband and kids know to watch out for stray sewing pins and to ask before eating anything made of fondant.