Sherlock Season Two Starts May 6 on PBS

Here’s a teaser for Sherlock Season Two, which will start its PBS Masterpiece Mystery run in the US on May 6th.

The series chronicles a modern day Sherlock Holmes and his adventures solving mysteries. Knowledge of the book series is helpful but not necessary. The adaptations loosely follow the originals with modern twists. Sherlock was co-created by Steven Moffat, the lead writer for Doctor Who. Several of us GeekMoms had the privilege of meeting him this year at a PBS event.

If you’re totally unfamiliar with Sherlock, I suggest you go watch the first season now, even if you think that the premise sounds lame. I promise it’s incredibly clever and packed with action.  You can watch Series 1 on Netflix, Amazon Prime, and PBS. You’ve got less than a week to get caught up. Go! (Some PBS stations will also be broadcasting a Sherlock marathon Sunday to give you one last chance to catch up before the new episode airs.)

The great part about the show airing on PBS is that it’s available for free. If you can’t tune into a local station, you can watch online shortly afterwards, just as PBS did with Downton Abbey.

The second season promises to be every bit as awesome as the first. Perhaps even more so. However, I do have one beef. This broadcast is nearly half a year after everyone else in the world got to see it. I’m reminded of  the Oatmeal. I suspect a lot of people are.

Moffat’s other baby, Doctor Who, eventually started broadcasting episodes in the US on the same day it aired in the UK. This was partially as a reaction to the rampant piracy and complaints about spoilers, and that was with just a two week delay. When will PBS  finally do the same for Masterpiece shows?

At any rate, watch (or re-watch) Sherlock on May 6th, and come tell us how much you love it!

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Marziah Karch lives in Portland, Oregon and is the author of multiple books and magazine articles. She also writes for Lifewire and GlitterSquid. She's currently a doctoral candidate researching the information behavior of independent game designers.