FCC Approves Net Neutrality Order: What Does It Mean?

Image credit: Flickr user Taramisu

So much of what we do today–as moms, and simply as citizens of the 21st century–relies on an open Internet. We’ve really come to take it for granted. Chatting with Grandma over Skype. Being able to stream Netflix through the PS3 after dinner. Getting advice from other moms online. Yesterday’s decision on the net neutrality order at the FCC was critical to the future of that openness–but in which direction?

Many of the articles and blog posts leading up to the announcement were questioning whether we even need the order. Taking an even more opposing stand, in one headline The Wall Street Journal calls net neutrality “The FCC’s Threat to Internet Freedom.” The article’s author says, “Nothing is broken that needs fixing.” Chairman Robert McDowell repeated those words in this morning’s meeting, saying, “Nothing is broken in the Internet access market that needs fixing.”

And with that, they entirely miss the point–that we must make sure nothing gets broken. It’s a lot easier to just move the vase to a higher shelf than to glue it back together once it’s shattered on the floor.

[To read the rest of Ruth Suehle’s post, visit our companion site, GeekMom.]