The Galileoscope, a Telescope for Everyone

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Portrait of Galileo Galilei by Justus Susterma...Portrait of Galileo Galilei by Justus Susterma...

Galileo Galilei, Image via Wikipedia

I still remember seeing Saturn’s rings through a telescope when I was about ten years old. The image of the planet, all white with beautiful rings encircling it, is forever burned into my memory. Most people who have seen such things as children never forget what it felt like to see them for the first time. The awe of seeing something so far away as if it was right in front of you can be life changing. A few months ago, my daughter and I saw Jupiter and its four Galilean moons through my (albeit larger) telescope. I know she’ll never forget it, and I won’t either.

You can now share this kind of joy and excitement with your little ones for a very reasonable price. It is always a great time for astronomy, but this year is particularly exciting because it is the International Year of Astronomy. As part of their effort to promote the study of the night sky, you can now buy the Galileoscope, a small, inexpensive, high-quality refractor telescope that is as similar as possible to the one Galileo made himself. You can repeat Galileo’s observations with help from this educational guide

Buy a telescope for yourself at $15 plus shipping, or donate one for $12.50 with no shipping charge, however the donation is not tax deductible. The telescope will attach to a standard tripod (not included), and will accept standard telescope attachments (also not included).

The telescope has only a two inch diameter, but for this price, you can bring the joy of astronomy to those who might not be able to afford a larger telescope. With even a telescope of this size, you are able to see sights such as lunar craters, the four largest moons of Jupiter, Saturn’s rings and many other objects.

If you have always wanted a telescope but could never afford one, now is your chance to see the night sky close up. The site will begin shipping the Galileoscope in late April.

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