Kickstarter Tabletop Alert: The New, Improved Quiver Gaming Mat

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Quiver Mat
The Quiver Gaming Gear Mat. Photo: Jonathan H. Liu

If you’ve read pretty much any of my tabletop game reviews in the past couple of months, then you’ve seen the Quiver Gaming Mat in action. It’s the dark grey background behind most of my components photos, and I’ve been playing games on it since the beginning of April. (Prior to this I had the first-generation Quiver Mat, which I wrote up two years ago—both have the same “Light of Knight” pattern on them so they look similar in photos.)

The second generation Quiver Gaming Mat just launched on Kickstarter, and you can check out the page for more info. The mat comes in three sizes, and in three different patterns: the one seen in my photos, a starfield, and a “Modern Gameplay” design with hexes on it. Here are the sizes, with prices:

  • Quiver Play: 14″ x 24″ ($45)
  • Quiver Light: 36″ x 36″ ($129)
  • Quiver Standard: 36″ x 48″ ($135)
  • Quiver Shield: 40″ x 60″ ($189)
Deep Sea Adventure
My kids playing Deep Sea Adventure on the Quiver Gaming Mat. Photo: Jonathan H. Liu

The one pictured above is the Quiver Standard size, and it just about covers my entire gaming table—a couple inches short on the length, and maybe an inch too wide (but easily trimmed).

I’d been using the first-gen mat for two years, and I really love it. It dampens the sound of dice rolls, it keeps cards and tiles from sliding around too much, and it makes cards easier to pick up than from a smooth wooden table. The first-gen material is felted on top (a bit like a pool table or casino table) and gets a little fuzzier with use. The second-gen material is a little tighter and less fuzzy, so it’s a little slicker but doesn’t pill as much. (And it’s still not as slippery as those giant mouse-pad gaming mats.)

Quiver Mat sample
A sample of the final material. Photo: Jonathan H. Liu

The gaming suede is attached to a high-density foam with a rubber backing. Another difference between this one and the first-gen material is that it’s more flexible—it unrolls and lays flat without having to let it sit for a while, and it’s easier to roll up and take with you. It does make it a little floppier—the old version I could push into place, but this one you will need to pull it if you need to shift the position. Designer Kevin Kerkhof has put a lot into creating this material—the first-gen was really nice, but I know there were some manufacturing issues. This version is even better, and is a gaming surface that could actually travel with you. (As much as I like the original version, it’s not one that I would probably ever take anywhere.)

The mats aren’t cheap, but the Kickstarter prices are lower than the eventual retail price will be, and it’s still significantly cheaper than buying a dedicated gaming table. If you play a lot of games, the Quiver Gaming Mat is a great way to upgrade your gaming table.

For more info, take a look at the Quiver Gaming Gear Kickstarter page.

New to Kickstarter? Check out our crowdfunding primer.

Review samples provided by Quiver Gaming Gear.

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