You’re Not Reading ‘The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl’? That’s Nuts!

Unbeatable Squirrel Girl #3 (Variant Cover by Gurihiru) © Marvel Comics
Unbeatable Squirrel Girl #3 (Variant Cover by Gurihiru) © Marvel Comics

For better or worse, social media has ushered in a new era of comic fans’ voices being heard. In recent weeks, negativity and harassment have dominated the online comics conversations. In the middle of it all, The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl #3 hit comic book store shelves, a welcome (and much needed in my case) reminder that comics can be fun.

Even when comics discussion on Twitter isn’t engulfed in flames, The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl is an entertaining, upbeat, refreshing, and yes, nutty series for readers of all ages and levels of fandom.

But I’m getting ahead of myself. Here are 5 more reasons you should be reading The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl.

1. It’s an ideal series for new-to-comics readers of all ages. You don’t need to know what’s coming up in Secret Wars (does anyone?) or have read Marvel Super-Heroes #8 to understand the nuances of the character. In a nutshell, Squirrel Girl is a confident part-girl, part-squirrel trying to make it through her first year of college. And she beat Wolverine once, no biggie.

2. It’s funny. Like, really funny. Writer Ryan North brings humor, fun, and personality to every page of this book. (How many times can I say “fun” in this list?)

Deadpool's Guide, Art by Erica North (The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl #3) © Marvel Comics
Deadpool’s Guide to Super Villains, Art by Erica Henderson (The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl #3) © Marvel Comics

When faced with a new foe, Squirrel Girl refers to her handy card deck, “Deadpool’s Guide to Super Villains.” Each of these cards is worth the cover price alone.

Jokes in the dialogue and background aren’t uncommon, either, so I find myself grinning from start to finish with every issue.

3. The art style is a refreshing change of pace. With a variety of body types and a superhero who dresses sensibly, Erica Henderson’s artwork gives me no qualms about sharing this book with everyone I know.

When asked in the letters section of Unbeatable Squirrel Girl #3 about Squirrel Girl’s body type, Henderson replied, “I tend to draw super heroines with more physical powers thicker because I honestly have a hard time believing that a 90-pound woman can take down a 200-pound steroidal dude who has equal fighting ability.”

4. The series is a few issues into the story, so it’s easy to catch up. Only three issues have been released so far, and you can find them easily on Comixology or in your local store. In fact, the first two issues both went to second printing due to demand.

5. Squirrel Girl has her own theme song. ‘Nuff said.

Kelly Knox is a freelance writer in Seattle, WA, where she contributes to local parenting magazines. She also writes for, Geek & Sundry, Forever Young Adult, and more. You can find crafts and art projects for geeky families at her blog The St{art} Button.