Stories by The Brothers Grimm Still Inspire

Reading Time: 3 minutes
Image: Minedition
Image: Minedition

One beautiful thing about stories that are in the public domain is that they can be retold, re-illustrated, and redone in new and creative ways. I am constantly discovering stories such as these, both those familiar to me and those new to my eyes and ears. Here is a collection of three Grimm stories that are brought to life once again and told through beautiful illustration.

The Pied Piper of Hamelin by The Brothers Grimm and illustrated by Lisbeth Zwerger

This legend has been told and retold countless times over the past several hundred years. This particular story can be quite scary for parents, and always brought me both wonder and terror as a child. Why would kids leave their town and go off with a complete stranger? How could they be so entranced by a simple song? I knew there must be magic in the tune that was played. The legend, however, could be based on truth. Did these children really disappear? If so, why? Did they die in The Plague? Was there another reason? We can wonder and speculate while reading this new version of the tale.

Image: Minedition
Image: Minedition

The Wolf & the Seven Kids by The Brothers Grimm and illustrated by Keiko Kaichi

A Grimm story with which I was not familiar, this one is very similar to Little Red Riding Hood below, but is much more adorable in my opinion. One of the illustrations actually made me laugh out loud as well. It is the tale of a mother goat leaving the house to get some food, leaving her seven kids at home with strict instructions to stay safe from the wolf. The usual storyline mishaps ensue, but, if you find baby goats as irresistible as I do, this book is a perfect one to share with your own kids.

Image: Minedition
Image: Minedition

Little Red Riding Hood by The Brothers Grimm and illustrated by Sybille Schenker

Filled with colorful artwork and die-cut pages, this version of the classic tale will enchant you along with your kids. This is not a sanitized version of the story. Rather, the publisher claims that it is true to the original Grimm version. (There is no happy ending for the wolf.) The story is well known, but you and your children will return to this book, again and again, to enjoy the see-through pages and relive the happy ending for Little Red Cap and her grandmother.

 

Photo: Jenny Williams
From Little Red Riding Hood. Photo: Jenny Williams
Photo: Jenny Williams
From Little Red Riding Hood. Photo: Jenny Williams

Share these classic stories with your kids, in whichever versions are your favorites.

Note: These books were sent for review purposes.

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