“No Disintegrations” For This Fett—Review of Boba Fett (Prototype Armor) Sixth Scale Figure

I’m going to guess that if you’re a Star Wars fan and you hear the name “Boba Fett” you’re going to be thinking something along the lines of:
Badass Bounty Hunter
Son of Jango Fett
Sarlac
“No disintegrations.”
“He’s no good to me dead.”

If you are not a Star Wars fan, you might think something along the lines of, “Who?” or “What’s a ‘Fett’?”

You know what comes to my mind when I think Boba Fett? I think one of the most expensive and difficult costume builds to grace the Costume Reference Library (or CRL) in the 501st Legion. In my opinion, the costume would be a lot easier if the paint job wasn’t so awesome.

Well…you can’t get simpler than all white can you?

Nope. And that’s exactly how he was supposed to look. Snowy white armor and flight suit with not a drip of color to his name. Actually, he wasn’t supposed to have a name either. Boba Fett is the child of the original idea Lucas had for Supertroopers. Eventually they decided to take the idea of a bunch of Supertroopers and turn it into one really awesome character.

Despite the fact that this is not the version that ended up in the movie, I’m happy to see that Sideshow Collectibles has released the Boba Fett (prototype armor) sixth-scale figure for those of us who would like to own a piece of Fett history.

This collectible figure comes with everything you need to display the Fett in all his glory, including weapons, extra hands for different poses, cape, and a replica of the Star Wars towel used in the 1978 video showcasing the original concept armor. Based on Ralph McQuarrie and Joe Johnston’s original design, this suit is a piece of Star Wars history.

It’s quite the conversation piece when someone comes into our home and notices that Fett is lacking his traditional green and yellow paint job. I’ll admit that while looking at him, I’ve been tempted to grab my paints and turn him into a custom Wolverine style Fett.

Some Star Wars fans have taken such a liking to the original “Supertrooper” design, they’ve opted to build it themselves.

Looking at the figure and pictures of a fellow trooper’s 501st Legion-approved Boba Fett, I’ve noticed a few differences between the movie version and the prototype:

  • Helmet lacks the famous dent in the top right.
  • Armor is smooth with no physical weathering.
  • He has fewer armor pouches on his main belt.
  • There’s no girth belt underneath his main belt (the braided belt that sits under the armor pouches).

Since the armor on this figure is the same as the movie, I can see it as a valuable resource when building any mandalorian style armor. I’ll warn you though. Mandos can be very difficult to build, but their awesomeness when completed is worth it. If you or someone you know would like to attempt this difficult, but amazing build, head over to The Dented Helmet or The Prop Replica Forum to learn how.

So, if you’re a Star Wars fan or a cosplayer looking for a reference piece to aid you in building a costume, I suggest you check out the Boba Fett (Prototype Armor) figure by Sideshow Collectibles.

Boba Fett (Prototype Armor) Sixth Scale Figure by Sideshow Collectibles is available now and costs $179.99 retail.

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‘Meet Boba Fett’

In 1978 Joe Johnston designed an early prototype of the infamous bounty
hunter Boba Fett, for Star Wars: Episode V – The Empire Strikes Back. The original ‘Supertrooper’ design featured striking all-white armor and the first prototypes of Fett’s trademark weapons.

Sideshow Collectibles proudly presents the Boba Fett (Prototype Armor)
Sixth Scale figure. With a fully articulated body, detailed accessories
and unique armor, the Boba Fett (Prototype Armor) Sixth Scale figure is a must-have addition for dedicated Star Wars fans.

Disclaimer: GeekMom was given a review sample. 

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Dakster Sullivan is a network administrator by day and a cosplayer by night. She loves discovering new books to read, tech to play with, and ways to express her herself. She has anxiety and depression and strives to educate others about these invisible illnesses.