Geeky Flowers for Mom

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The Wikus Flower is just one way to give Mom a geeky token of unconditional love this Mother’s Day. All images by Lisa Kay Tate

Every mom deserves flowers on Mother’s Day, but not every mom needs or wants an over-stated floral shop bouquet.

Instead, give her a single flower reminder of how much she means via her favorite fandoms with these geeky flower ideas:

wikus
Replace paper with metallic wrappers and upcycled “trash” turns a regular tissue paper flower into a District 9 prop.

Wikus’s “Rubbish” Flower Gift from District 9. Underneath the raw, documentary-style story of the alien concentration camp, District 9 possessed a beautiful and heartbreaking love story about main character Wikus Van De Merwe’s unending devotion to his wife, despite his transformation from human to alien. Wikus continued to express this love by leaving little flowers made from found items in the trash at her door. I keep a homemade version of this token on my bedside bookstand as a reminder love overlooks all flaws. It’s also a great craft for dads to make with their kids, since it requires some potential sharp edges.

This is very similar to the “tissue paper flowers” made everywhere from Kindergarten craft classes to parade floats. The only difference it the materials. Instead of tissue, find two or three pieces some pliable metallic items such as juice drink bags or candy wrappers. Accordion fold them as you would a tissue paper flower for paper bow tie.

Use metal floral wire, metallic pipe cleaners, or a thin wire coat hanger to wrap around the center of the folded piece to secure it. This might take the help of some needle-nose pliers, if using a thick enough wire. Make sure any sharp ends of this wire stem are folded or wrapped in duct tape.

Once secure, open up the folded piece, until the flower is as full as you want it. These can be adorned with anything from leaves cut from aluminum cans and ribbons, or metallic plastic metal beads in the center. Leave it on mom’s bedside stand before she wakes up, just like Wikus might have.

Pieces of silk mum or carnation, and green yarn or floss can be turned into a celery stalk for the Fifth Doctor's signature "decorative vegetable."
Pieces of silk mum or carnation, and green yarn or floss can be turned into a celery stalk for the Fifth Doctor’s signature “decorative vegetable.”

The Fifth Doctor’s “Decorative Vegetable” from Doctor Who. Here’s a little something different for classic Doctor Who fans; the Fifth Doctor’s celery stock boutonniere. This item helped him test airflow, and protected him from certain toxic gases, but it also added some much needed color to his mostly white cricket uniform.

Find a light green silk flower like a carnation or mum, and separate the layers. Bunch up each layer to look like the leafy part of a celery stalk. Make about three of four of these, and layer these “leaves” together with glue.

Take a few strands of 4″ or 5″ green yarn or embroidery floss, and tie a single strand of yarn around them at both ends, as well as in the center, so they resemble the stalk itself.

Using a felt tip marker or craft paint, draw a red line along both edges of a white piece of ribbon, and use it to attach the stalk to the flower. Secure with glue if needed.

Attach this to a jacket lapel with a safety pin. Give it to mom with a little hand-written Whovian-inside joke,  “Don’t let this turn purple.”

The Black Lotus from BBC’s Sherlock. This unassuming origami flower was the calling card of the Black

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 Make a Sherlock Black Lotus pin by using dark paper with and origami "lotus blossom" pattern.

Make a Sherlock Black Lotus pin by using dark paper with and origami “lotus blossom” pattern.

Lotus Tong, the organized crime group from China, featured in “The Blind Banker” episode from Sherlock.

Using a black or dark piece of origami paper, or regular paper cut in a square, follow the standard “Origami Lotus Blossom” design. The Sherlockology site also has an easy step-by-step, but I would also recommend watching a brief video tutorial before starting. Even after seeing the tutorial, be patient with this one. Origami steps are easy to figure out and remember, but may take a few tries to master. Don’t be discouraged if you have to go through a few sheets of paper until you have the flower you want.

Once the flower is folded, attach it to a lapel pin back or safety pin with a glue gun or super glue, and give it mom on a little cardstock square of Sherlock-inspired wallpaper. It makes a nice little coat or shirt pin, and might even draw the attention of a wiry British sleuth in an overcoat.

Hang a small silk rose from an upside-down jar for Beast's enchanted rose.
Hang a small silk rose from an upside-down jar for Beast’s enchanted rose.

Beast’s Enchanted Rose from Disney’s Beauty and the Beast. I much preferred The Beast in his beastly form than the standard generic prince, and the withering enchanted rose was such a gorgeous symbol of the internal struggle of the beauty and good that lies within everyone. It also makes a cute little night-light.

Using school or craft glue, sprinkle a little clear, silver, or gold glitter onto a small silk rose (the open flower, not a bud). Take a glass jar large enough to contain the rose, and use the glue to draw designs on the inside of the jar, Sprinkle some glitter in the jar, and move it around so it coats the glue designs.

Tie “invisible” fishing line to the rose, and attach the other end of the line to the inside bottom of the jar. Use enough line so the rose appears to “float” in the jar when the jar is turned upside down.

Place a small flameless tea candle on the lid of the jar, and surround it with cotton or tissue paper to cover the candle. When the candle is lit, it will illuminate the “enchanted” rose, for a cozy little light able sooth a savage beast, or let Mom know she’s special.

Lisa Kay Tate is a veteran feature writer with 20 years experience in newspaper, magazine and freelance writing. In addition to serving as Associate Editor for her local arts and entertainment guide, El Paso Scene, she has been a regular contributor to the site ihogeek.com and maintains her own blogsite at lisathegeekmom.wordpress.com. She and her husband, writer/photographer Rick, live on the edge of "New Texico" where they keep busy raising their two geeklings and sharing space with their dog, Sirius Black, and cat, Loki.