Jeffrey Brown Proves That Kids Are Weird

Image: Chronicle Books
Image: Chronicle Books

All of our kids say inexplicable things sometimes. We, as adults, are used to certain patterns of speech, chunks of meaning strung together in predictable patterns. Kids, especially the small ones, haven’t learned these patterns yet, so they often use different words or phrases to express what they mean, make requests, or represent their environment. This often comes out in hilarious and unexpected ways. Most of us parents will write down some of these kid-isms or share them on Facebook, but Jeffrey Brown, author of Vader’s Little Princess and Darth Vader and Son, has put dozens into his new book, Kids Are Weird.

A series of scenes, conversations, and one-off spoutings of kid genius, Kids Are Weird is a thorough journey through the mind of Brown’s five-year-old son, Oscar. Oscar gives his opinion on matters such as having friends over, ice cream, girls, scary movies, his parents, Elton John’s fashion choices, and many more.

There isn’t one cohesive narrative in the book, but any parents of small kids will smile, nod, and occasionally giggle at Oscar’s loquacious ramblings. Many of us could write a similar book, but Brown’s attractive illustrations punctuate the words very effectively.

Oscar’s perspective can help you see the world in new ways, and will show you that you aren’t alone in being puzzled by the sometimes confusing words of your own little ones.

A perfect book for Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, expectant parents, or even kids themselves, Kids Are Weird ($14.95) is a fun journey through the mind of a five-year-old boy. I wish I could regain some of my creative descriptions of the world. Oscar has inspired me.

GeekMom received this item for review purposes.

Get the GeekDad Books!

   

Jenny Bristol is an Editor at GeekDad and a founding Director at GeekMom. She is a lifelong geek who spends her time learning, writing, homeschooling her two wickedly smart kids, losing herself in history, and mastering the art of traveling on a shoestring.