Toy Box 101: Getting Started With Disney Infinity

Here’s my first in a series of How-To videos for Disney Infinity Toy Box mode.

This time last year Disney Infinity was a well kept secret at Disney Interactive as we wondered how the toy-meets-video-game genre would play out. Of course now we know all about Disney Infinity and the different franchise Play Sets it comes with (The Incredibles, Pirates of the Caribbean, Monsters University) and can be purchased separately (Toy Story, Lone Ranger, Cars).

Less understood though are the Toy Box modes that come with the game and each character. I have to admit that I’ve been more than a little remiss at really investigating what’s on offer here.

In fact it wasn’t until my kids started trying their hand at the Toy Box game creation that I really took notice at just how flexible it is. Maybe it’s because you have to earn the sparks to spin for random items in the Toy Box that led to me being slow on the uptake, or my lack of time to work through the tutorials systematically — either way it seems I’m not the only dad late to the party.

Syndrome and Sully in Toy Box
Syndrome and Sully in Toy Box

In case you didn’t already realize, the Toy Box mode allows players to create not only their own worlds but also game logic. It’s kind of like Lego meets LittleBigPlanet, certainly as flexible as Media Molecule’s tour de force in game creation but without some of the complexity.

It’s a conversation I’ve been having over and over with different families: how to get started with the Disney Infinity Toy Box. This then leads on to some specific suggestions of how to get the most out of these tools once you know where to find them in the game.

To that end, and with the help of Disney, I’ve set-up some of the families I work with on Disney Infinity to see how they get on and create a set of Toy Box 101 “how to” videos. This week I’m starting with the first in the series that looks at finding the Toy Box mode in the game and what each of the different buttons have to offer.

Buzz, Mater and Dash in Toy Box
Buzz, Mater and Dash in Toy Box

Next week I’ll have a video from one of the test families creating the start of their Toy Box world, and then we’ll look at how to make use of the more complex tools the week after that.

I hope this is a useful way to get you started creating something of your own. If there’s something you’d like us to cover then just leave a comment and we’ll be sure to have a look at that toy or feature in the next video.

Keep track with the tutorial via the Toy Box playlist or subscribe to Family Gamer TV.

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Andy Robertson has three children (6, 8 and 10) and enjoys racing R/C cars, playing board games and video games with his family. He has been writing about technology and the family for six years. Recently he has covered the Skylanders games in depth. He speaks and writes as a Family Video-game Expert for the BBC and runs the Family Gamer TV show.