IPads in the Classroom: A Case Study in Auburn, Maine – Part One

Image: Amazon.com

My son turned two this fall. By the time he starts kindergarten in three years’ time, I have no idea how he will be learning. The first computer I was exposed to in elementary school used 5 ¼-inch floppy discs; I’m not even sure he’ll be using a computer by then. Classrooms around the country are beginning to introduce students as young as five to iPads in an effort to determine if they will be useful in the classroom, and if they will be more cost effective for the functionality. Quite frankly I wasn’t sure how to feel about this. I plan on being involved in my son’s education. I’m going to be the kindergarten mom rallying support for construction at the high school he will attend in a decade. I’m going to be the middle school mom lobbying for the ed tech in the first grade classroom. So I need to know, where do I stand on technology as part of my baby’s education?

At the beginning of the current school year I had a chance to talk with Peter Robinson, the Director of Information Technology for the Auburn school department in Maine. With the support and help of his district and some federal money, Robinson’s staff is pioneering the use of iPads in the classroom–in kindergarten to be precise.

[Read the first half of Sarah Pinault’s two-part interview on iPads in the kindergarten classroom at GeekMom!]