Comfort, Style, and Ergonomics: The Razer Iskur Gaming Chair

If you’re a PC gamer, you’re undoubtedly familiar with the Razer name. Best known for their exceptional computer mice, Razer also makes laptops, keyboards, headphones, and many other accessories. And last year, they entered the competitive gaming chair market with the Razer Iskur.

Highlighted features of the Razer Iskur include:

  • Multi-layered synthetic leather
  • High density foam cushions
  • 4D armrests
  • Adjustable lumbar support
  • Steel-reinforced body
  • Memory foam head cushion
  • 3 Year warranty

The Razer Iskur is recommended for heights between 5’6″ – 6’2″, and for weights up to 299lbs.

Is this the chair that will see you through long hours of work and MMO raids? Let’s take a look.

The chair has arrived. Image by Paul Benson.

Packaging

When FedEx showed up at my house, it was with a fairly sizeable box on their dolly. The iconic Razer logo(based off of the South African Boomslang snake) is emblazoned on the box, as well as Razer’s slogan, “For Gamers. By Gamers.” Rigid cardboard corner protectors run around all four long corners of the box, to give the package extra protection during shipping.

 

Cautions when assembling and operating your chair. Image by Paul Benson.

Opening the box, you’re immediately greeted by some cautionary messages on the box flaps. I’m somewhat curious as to how many people with Iskurs also own six-foot rockets, but nevertheless, Razer makes it very clear you should neither leave your rocket on the seat of your gaming chair, nor launch it from that spot.

Underneath the box flaps, there’s a welcome message from the Razer CEO, along with a QR code which takes you to a video on how to assemble your new chair:

A thank you from Razer. Image by Paul Benson.

Flipping over that sheet gives you the easy to follow assembly instructions in print form:

Iskur assembly instructions. Image by Paul
Benson.

And then directly under that is several layers of foam, and all the parts and tools that you will need to put together your Razer Iskur. Here’s a look at the inside of the box, after removing the chair back, base, and a lot of foam:

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The bottom layer of the Iskur shipping box. Image by Paul Benson.

You can see that there are more of those rigid cardboard supports inside the box, but this time at the shorter corners. There’s also a second layer of cardboard running around the interior of the shipping box. I don’t think I’ve ever received anything that was packed with as much protection as my Razer Iskur was. You’re going to have quite a bit of foam left once you’re done.

All the foam sheets from the Iskur box. Image by Paul Benson.

Assembly

Removing all the pieces from the box, I laid everything out and got to work.

All the Iskur pieces. Image by Paul Benson.

Opening up the accessories box, you’ll find a plastic container with the few pieces of hardware you’ll need to assemble the chair. Printed on the cardboard that covers some of that hardware are instructions on how to make the various height and angle adjustments on your assembled chair.

The accessories box. Image by Paul Benson.

Once you start the assembly, it should only take you ten minutes or so to put everything together. It took me a bit longer, but I was also stopping to take photos along the way. The parts fit very well together, the instructions are easy to follow, and you’re left with a very solid chair upon completion.

The already assembled seat
The seat back attached.
Tilt and lumbar controls attached
The assembled base.
Back of the finished chair.

In no time at all, you’ve got a finished chair, ready to adjust to your liking.

An assembled Razer Iskur. Image by Paul Benson.

And there are a lot of adjustments that can be made to the Razer Iskur. Chair height, seat angle, seat back recline, lumbar support, armrest height, armrest depth, and armrest angle.

The 4D armrest in action. Image by Paul Benson.

The Verdict

Back in my early 30’s, I herniated a disc in my lower back. While I recovered from that injury, my back has never been in the greatest shape since then. I still suffer from occasional spasms and pain. I spend a lot of time in front of my computer for both work and gaming, so I need a chair that will support my back and promote good alignment of my spine.

I’ve spent just over a week so far with the Razer Iskur, and it’s everything I’ve hoped for in those regards. Having tweaked the various adjustments to the chair, I find that it’s not only very comfortable, but promotes a proper sitting position. With my old chair, I found it very easy to fall into bad habits, slouching and crossing my ankles. But with the Iskur, my body is naturally encouraged to sit up, with my feet flat on the ground. It definitely helps that instead of just a memory foam pillow as with so many other gaming chairs, Razer has integrated an adjustable lumbar support, so that you can position the backrest exactly in line with the curve of your lower back.

The headrest of the Iskur without the head pillow in place. Image by Paul Benson.

The Razer Iskur currently comes in just two variants: black with green trim, and all black. The chair definitely identifies itself as being a gamer chair via its silhouette, not to mention the Razer motto on the front of the seat. But the design is understated compared to many of the more garish examples from other manufacturers of gaming chairs. Razer has instead gone with a more subtle approach, using honeycombed stitching on both the seat and lumbar support, and a kevlar-textured trim on the sides, to create a striking piece of furniture.

The Razer Iskur combines comfort, style, and ergonomics into a gaming chair that will make you and your back happy through many long hours of work and play. Both variants retail for $499.99, and you can purchase one today at Amazon or directly from the Razer store.

Razer provided a chair for evaluation, but had no input into this review.

 

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This post was last modified on May 12, 2021 11:16 am

Paul Benson

Paul is a comic book writer, screenwriter, an avid board and tabletop gamer, reader of comics and collector of statues and figures. He is the creator of the webcomic "Heroines for Hire" and co-writer of "Disaster!: The Movie." He currently writes "E.I.: Earth Invasion" for Wunderman Comics.

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