A Terraria Christmas Story: Hardmode Items from the North Pole

A screenshot of the sandbox game, Terraria.

My 7-year-old son is really into an open-ended 2D sandbox game on his iPhone called Terraria. In fact, he is so into it that this Christmas season on the top of his list to Santa was “the best items in the game”. I honestly expressed to him my doubt that Santa could deliver, since most presents are made in the elves’ workshop, and that Terraria on the iPhone has no “creative mode” to add items at will. “No, daddy,” was the reply, “Santa can hack!” Oh yes, this was going to be interesting. Continue reading

2015 Holiday Gift Guide #7: DIY and Makers

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Artist, maker, electronics geek, DIY enthusiast, and builder are just some of the names we call ourselves, but, whatever your moniker, we all share a love for creating, building, and the warm sense of accomplishment. Recent advances in technology, and price of the technology, have been a boon to the maker and DIY movement. Below we list the tools, technologies, supplies, and projects that inspired us this year. Continue reading

Calling All Makers: Be a Part of the Denver Mini Maker Faire

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Fire up your soldering irons and sharpen up your scissors. The 2015 Mini Maker Faire is returning to the Denver Museum of Nature and Science June 13-14, and they want you. Continue reading

Helping Kids Hack the Future: GeekDad Interviews Shawn Scott

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People often become geeks because of their parents or mentors. Tony Stark would never have become Iron Man without his father, Howard Stark. Shawn Scott is super geek and super dad working to develop the next generation of geeks all across the United States. Continue reading

Hacking the Holidays

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One of my favorite things about the maker revolution is the availability of tools that a decade ago were out of reach of the average hobbyist. Sure, magazines like Nuts & Volts catered to the die-hard hobbyists, but before the internet, and before e-commerce it was difficult for the average guy to find the parts for their projects. It wasn’t just availability either, the price of these things was high. Development boards for microcontrollers cost upwards of $100 and more, and small parts often had a minimum order of 100 units.
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FireFly Controller Board Simplifies Rocket Science

Recently, my friend Mike Doornbos from Evadot got together with the small-satellite crew down at the non-profit Kentucky Space to try to fix an annoying problem. They wanted a standard “mission command” board that could serve as the basis for … Continue reading