GeekDad http://geekdad.com Raising Geek Generation 2.0 Fri, 03 Jul 2015 22:16:33 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.2 GeekDad Daily Deals: Rocketcases Afterburner iPhone Battery Case http://geekdad.com/2015/07/rocketcases-afterburner-iphone-battery-case/ http://geekdad.com/2015/07/rocketcases-afterburner-iphone-battery-case/#comments Fri, 03 Jul 2015 15:39:03 +0000 http://geekdad.com/?p=100875 Keep firing off calls for longer with Rocketcases Afterburner iPhone Battery Case: 1/3 off today Continue reading

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Rocketcases Afterburner iPhone Battery Case

More than double your phone’s power with today’s Daily Deal, the Rocketcases Afterburner iPhone Battery Case. This thin case adds another 150% charge to your iPhone. Click the link above to see details.

Be sure to check GeekDad’s section called Daily Deals. Each weekday we will offer new deals on cool stuff. These deals have limited lifespans, so keep checking back. Also, create an account and sign up for our newsletter at https://deals.geekdad.com/sign_up or follow our Store RSS Feed at https://deals.geekdad.com/feed.

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Why You Should Teach Your Kids to Unfriend Without Guilt http://geekdad.com/2015/07/unfriend-without-guilt/ http://geekdad.com/2015/07/unfriend-without-guilt/#comments Fri, 03 Jul 2015 15:00:34 +0000 http://geekdad.com/?p=100707 Teach your kids that just because someone is your friend doesn't mean they're your friend. Continue reading

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unfriend-feat

I try to set a good example for my children in my social networking. Rule one is to avoid friending people you don’t actually know in real life. I’ve friended a very small subset of people I’ve met on message boards or even in mutual Facebook discussions, but overall they’re people I know (at least Facebook – Twitter is expressly for following people you don’t actually know). The second one is to be willing to let go.

Why am I so quick to unfriend? Simple.

Social media has changed the concept of what a friend is, and not just by making it a verb. In life, we meet hundreds of people who we would normally lose touch with or even outgrow. This is a normal part of life. Or at least it was. Now, we tend to hold on to those connections longer thanks to Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Ello or what-have-you.

Just kidding. No-one uses Ello. Source: Ello.co

Just kidding. No-one uses Ello.
Source: Ello.co

And it’s not just the casuals; I’ve unfriended people I’ve known for decades when it became clear the friendship wasn’t healthy (say, you spend all your time arguing). I also block, especially if someone crosses my parental boundaries. And, yes, I do it in real life too.

This is a skill all our children need. My daughter was in 3rd grade when she stood up to a class bully by saying “You think you’re my friend, but you’re not; friends don’t act this way. If you want to be my friend, act like it and I’ll be there. Otherwise, I’ll be over there.” My daughter just graduated 8th grade and the aforementioned young lady just reconnected over Instagram, wanting to start fresh. Will they stay friends? Who knows. But if it does not work out, I am confident that my daughter will know when to click the button that disconnects them.

Remember, your feed/wall is your digital home. If you see that someone is not someone you’d want to invite to hang out in your real house, why would you invite them into your virtual one?

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Worlds Collide As Johnny Boo Meets Dragon Puncher! http://geekdad.com/2015/07/johnny-boo-meets-dragon-puncher/ http://geekdad.com/2015/07/johnny-boo-meets-dragon-puncher/#comments Fri, 03 Jul 2015 14:30:39 +0000 http://geekdad.com/?p=100715 If you've got young kids and you're not familiar with James Kochalka's fantastic kids series, you should fix that right away. To date, there are six Johnny Boo books and two Dragon Puncher titles. All are quirky, cute, imaginative, and endlessly re-readable. Now, his two series collide in 'Johnny Boo Meets Dragon Puncher!' and sees the most fearsome robot-kitty-warrior teams up with the best little ghost in the world to take on a terrifying Ice Dragon! Continue reading

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Johnny Boo Meets Dragon Puncher cover design
Johnny Boo is back! And so is Dragon Puncher!

If you’ve got young kids and you’re not familiar with James Kochalka’s fantastic kids series, you should fix that right away. To date, there are six Johnny Boo books and two Dragon Puncher titles. All are quirky, cute, imaginative, and endlessly re-readable.

Now, Kochalka’s two series collide in Johnny Boo Meets Dragon Puncher! and sees the most fearsome robot-kitty-warrior teams up with the best little ghost in the world to take on a terrifying Ice Dragon!

To celebrate the release of this book, in which WORLDS COLLIDE, James Kochalka stopped by GeekDad HQ to share his thoughts about children’s literature (and some pages from the new book)!

Take it away, James!


KochalkaWhen I was a kid, I loved the characters in the comics I read, and I loved their stories, but I also loved the worlds that the characters existed in. And to see two characters from two different worlds combined into one was thrilling. I loved the team-ups between Richie Rich and Casper. I loved when Superman fought Muhammad Ali. I drew my own comics that mashed up Star Wars and Battlestar Galactica. So when I got the idea to combine Johnny Boo and Dragon Puncher … it was like a little flash of lightning that brought me straight back to the literary thrills of my childhood.  And when I would tell my young readers that this would be the subject of my next book, I could see the lightning flash in their own brains as well.

I like to see the lightning flash. I want to give the readers something that excites, surprises, and delights them. There’s a lot of kids books out there that really contain no lightning at all, I’m afraid.

Mostly though, when I draw these things, I’m actually just trying to entertain my own kids. I read them the rough drafts as bedtime stories, a chapter or two at a time, as I work on them. The Dragon Puncher books especially are quite intimately woven into our family life. The background photos are landscapes that we visit often, either right around our house or favorite vacation spots. And since the characters are brush & ink drawings combined with photographs of our real faces, that means the kids actually participate in the creation of the book by posing for the photographs and acting the very particular emotions that I need in each individual comic panel. In the process of creating these books, we are creating amazing family memories for ourselves as well.

And from the feedback we’ve received from other families, it looks like we’re creating amazing memories for them as well as they share the books together. Storytime is perhaps the best time … snuggle up, feel the love, and dive into the world of the book together.

jbvdp_01 jbvdp_02 jbvdp_03 jbvdp_04 jbvdp_05

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Kickstarter Tabletop Alert: ‘Foodfighters’ Is a Strategic Game for All Ages http://geekdad.com/2015/07/foodfighters/ http://geekdad.com/2015/07/foodfighters/#comments Fri, 03 Jul 2015 14:00:35 +0000 http://geekdad.com/?p=100835 New to Kickstarter, 'Foodfighters' will fill the belly of any child ready to move beyond 'Candyland' to more hearty fare. Continue reading

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Photo: Sean Jacquemain, The Worker Placement

Photo: Sean Jacquemain, The Worker Placement

There’s often a gap between games for kids and games for adults. Games for kids feature fast play, colorful and simple mechanics, and a lot of luck. Games for adults are often complicated, have a lot to keep in your head while you play, and have strategy well beyond the basic mechanics of the game.

When your child is hungry for more than just Candyland, it’s tough to find games that you can play with them, ones that keep them engaged and entertained, but also start to encourage their strategic side. Most games do not cut the mustard here, and this can cause frustration all around. As much as I try not to, sometimes I commiserate with Louis CK’s take on Monopoly.

That’s where Foodfighters comes in.

Photo: Sean Jacquemain, The Worker Placement

Photo: Sean Jacquemain, The Worker Placement

At a glance:
Foodfighters is a duel between the Meat gang and the Vegetable army, a culinary fight-to-the-finish. Foods jockey for position, taking stabs at their particular nemeses, and only one team can be the victor.

Billed as a 2-player game for kids and adults, Foodfighters just launched on Kickstarter and a pledge of $29CAD or higher will get you a copy of the game. It comes with a 8+ age suggestion – my daughter had no trouble with the concepts at 11, and the designers tell me their six-year-old plays it with no problem. Younger kids may have to have some of the power cards explained to them.

New to Kickstarter? Read our crowdfunding primer.

Components:

  • 18 Fighters (9 cards for each team)
  • 6 Power cards (3 for each team)
  • 1 Price card
  • 2 pans, 6 crackers, 4 spoons and 30 beans
  • 2 ‘normal’ dice and 1 bonus die. Each die has one or two ‘splats’ and the other sides have between 1 and 3 beans
Beans and Dice: A hearty meal

When your opponent has the ‘Special’ die you can legitimately tell them they are full of beans. Photo: Sean Jacquemain, The Worker Placement

We played with a demo version of the game but if the quality of the demo is any indicator, the final product will be very palatable indeed.

The Fighter cards are thick and durable, each illustrated with a separate food and that food’s particular enemy. The power and price cards are playing-card thin but well designed and easy to read. All the other items are wood cut – easy to pick up and use and not fragile in the slightest, something I appreciate with my meaty fingers.

How to play:
There’s a free print and play version on the Kickstarter page if you want an appetizer.

The object of the game is to be the first to knock out three of your opponent’s matching cards. The Meat are represented by a steak, a chicken leg, and a piece of bacon; the Vegetables are an onion, a cabbage, and a stalk of broccoli. So if the Meat take out three cabbages, for instance, it’s game over for the photosynthetic side.

Each team is arranged in a 3×3 grid, dealt out randomly. Each card has only one type of opponent they can target and only if they are in reach either vertically or diagonally. In most cases the range is one spot but this can be upgraded.

On each player’s turn they can swap around the position of two of their Fighters (or move one to an empty gap in the same row), attack an opponent in range or roll the dice for some beans. Beans are the currency of the game, used to purchase tools for your Fighters as well as access your special powers.

“Beans are BOTH a vegetable AND a protein!” my daughter exclaimed. “They are on BOTH sides!” She claims she figured this out before me. We disagree on this point.

  • Swapping is simple – any two Fighters anywhere on your side can shift places, or a Fighter can move to an empty spot on the same row. In both cases they can bring along any items they have. Swapping gets you a free bean as well.
  • Attacking is done by rolling the ‘normal’ dice, with one or more ‘splats’ knocking out the opponent and letting you claim the card for your win pile. If you don’t get a ‘splat’ you get as many beans as are showing on the dice.
  • If choose to roll for beans, you roll the dice and re-roll any splats. Collect the beans showing.

Once you’ve finished your action, you can then buy one item with your beans. Crackers let your Fighter take an extra hit, spoons let them hit targets further away (but still in a straight line) and pans let them attack any enemy in range.

You can also buy the bonus die, and use it on the next die roll you make for any reason. After the roll, it goes back in the kitchen to be purchased again. This makes it a delicious item to have ready.

You could also purchase and use one of your special powers. Each card is unique and has its own price. Each side has different powers, giving their abilities their own unique flavor. Some are one-use, some can be purchased and used over and over, and some stay active as long as the card is in play. They have simple mechanics but a seasoned player can find ways to use them to their advantage.

Once all this is done, the opponent must fill in any gaps in their line of scrimmage by bringing a Fighter forwards from the furthest back row with any Fighters left in it. Then it’s their turn at the buffet.

The verdict:
Let’s get to the meat of this: we loved it.

Digesting the rules didn’t take long at all and the setup is quick and easy. We tried to play on a coffee table and that wasn’t quite enough room for six rows of cards head-to-head. Be sure to give yourself a little space to lay out the battleground and prepare the ‘kitchen’ where all the purchasable items go.

Our first game was fast – a straight on a-salt. My opening random placement left me particularly vulnerable – my three steaks were right out in front, so I had to spend my first few rounds scrambling to shift them to safe places and load them with crackers while my daughter tried to tenderize them with a pan.

Leave room.

Leave some room to play. Don’t want to be starved for space. Photo: Sean Jacquemain, The Worker Placement

My coordinated use of a pan and a spoon took its toll on her veggie forces. I almost had her, but she had put out her Bean Boost! power early on and was clocking in two beans for every successful attack. She even used her one-use Re-grow! power to pull back one of her knocked-out Fighters to snatch the win from me.

The second game I played more defensively: I focused on putting crackers into play and using my Meat Shield! power to place two beans as bonus crackers to protect my key Fighters. She countered with multiple uses of the Bonus Die to chew down my defense and gain tons of beans. A judicious use of The Wurst! at the right time broke one of her crackers and let my chicken take her last cabbage with a spoon thrown from the back row.

Each game took no longer than 15 minutes and I predict future matches could be complete in under five.

Foodfighters is very well balanced for adults and kids. The strategic options are clear and simple but encourage creative uses to maximum their potential.

Originally I had thought that the power costs were too high, but they are meant to be that way, to keep the game focused on the direct play – when a power is used it is because that player starved to get it. And while no power is directly devastating, used in the right way at the right time, they can change the whole taste of the game.

Foodfighters is a great can-we-play-something game in the short time after homework is done and before bed, or between bouts of longer games on family game night.

Frankly, my only complaint is that the rules lack any food puns. I personally like to dish them out.

Final note:
When I asked my daughter if she had an appetite to play again, she enthusiastically said, “Yes!” You can’t do much better than that.

Check it out for yourself on their Kickstarter page.

Disclosure: I received a prototype copy for review purposes.

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GeekDad Review: Grain Audio OHEP Solid Wood Over Ear Headphones http://geekdad.com/2015/07/grain-audio-ohep/ http://geekdad.com/2015/07/grain-audio-ohep/#comments Fri, 03 Jul 2015 13:30:03 +0000 http://geekdad.com/?p=100744 If you follow the world of Kickstarter campaigns, you've probably heard of Grain Audio. The brainchild of "two ex-Altec Lansing guys, an architect/furniture designer and a liquor industry operational expert," Grain Audio raised over $155k (well over the $120k goal) to produce a line-up of premium audio gear featuring solid wood design. I was sent a pair of OHEP Solid Wood Over Ear Headphones featuring FSC certified walnut ear cups to try out. The wood certainly makes for an attractive set of headphones, but does it make them sound better? Continue reading

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Grain Audio's wlanut cup OHEP headphones

Grain Audio OHEP Solid Wood Over Ear Headphones (photo by Brad Moon)

If you follow the world of Kickstarter campaigns, you’ve probably heard of Grain Audio. The brainchild of “two ex-Altec Lansing guys, an architect/furniture designer and a liquor industry operational expert,” Grain Audio raised over $155k (well over the $120k goal) to produce a line-up of premium audio gear featuring solid wood design. I was sent a pair of OHEP Solid Wood Over Ear Headphones featuring FSC-certified walnut ear cups to try out. The wood certainly makes for an attractive set of headphones, but does it make them sound better?

I’ve been spending a lot of time testing our various headphones over the past few months and one thing most have in common — to one degree or another — is an emphasis on bass.

Some are very pronounced (like the House of Marley Liberate XLBTs) while others are more subtle, but it’s usually there.

The Grain Audio OHEP headphones had a much more balanced audio curve than I’ve been used to. The low end was always there, but it never dominated. In songs where bass features prominently, it had an authoritative presence instead of booming. Listening to tracks with other headphones, then switching to the Grain Audio headphones, I could often pick up instruments deep in the mix that I had missed previously. Crank up the volume and things sound even better, without distortion.

I’m not sure if the audio performance is because of the 40mm speakers with Neodymium magnets and CCAW voice coils, the walnut ear cups or a combination of the two (I suspect the wood cups definitely come into play at higher volumes), but it makes for a very enjoyable listening experience. It takes some getting used to if you’re accustomed to bass enhancement, but when you start comparing tracks against other headphones to see what you’ve been missing, it’s tough to go back.

Grain Audio OHEP headphones made from solid walnut, leather and plastic

Gray Leather, plastic and natural walnut makes for an attractive, comfortable and sturdy design. Image copyright Grain Audio

Speaking of the walnut ear cups, they’re the standout visual feature on these headphones. FSC-certified wood with a hand-applied oil finish, they look very handsome, especially paired with the dark gray leather pads. The frame is a matching gray plastic that helps to keep weight down (they tip the scales at 8 oz) without looking cheap.

The headphones look and feel quite sturdy, although the cups were just slightly small for my ears. They were still quite comfortable, but I had to shift them around a bit to get a good seal.

Also included with the headphones (which have a removable cable) are a 1/4-inch adapter and a soft carrying case.

An inline mic and remote lets you take phone calls when used with a smartphone. The documentation included a somewhat cryptic “Mic button functions will vary with playback device” and it looks like you can skip tracks using it with some devices, but I couldn’t get that feature to work with my iPhone.

I never end up using headphone remotes to control the music anyway, so that was no big deal…

If you’re in the market for some distinctive headphones with a unique look and a natural sound curve, the $199 Grain Audio OHEP Solid Wood Over Ear Headphones should definitely be on your short list.

Disclosure: Grain Audio supplied OHEP Solid Wood Over Ear Headphones for the purposes of this review.

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‘Magic: The Gathering Arena of the Planeswalkers’ Now Available! http://geekdad.com/2015/07/mtg-arena-of-the-planeswalkers/ http://geekdad.com/2015/07/mtg-arena-of-the-planeswalkers/#comments Fri, 03 Jul 2015 13:00:03 +0000 http://geekdad.com/?p=100576 Announced back in October of last year, 'Magic: The Gathering Arena of the Planeswalkers' is now available! Continue reading

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Image courtesy of Hasbro

Image courtesy of Hasbro


Back in October, I wrote about an as-yet-to-be-named Magic: The Gathering board game. The concept was pretty exciting – Hasbro was working with Wizards of the Coast, pulling together designers from HeroScape and other great games like Risk Legacy, to develop a strategy board game set in the MtG universe.

Since then, the folks at Hasbro have been busy pulling together the finishing touches. And just in time for the long holiday weekend, Magic: The Gathering Arena of the Planeswalkers is now available on Amazon and at select game shops! The game will be everywhere else, including HasbroToyShop.com, on August 1.

Image courtesy of Hasbro

Image courtesy of Hasbro

The final product looks great and manages to capture that HeroScape vibe while, very obviously, still being a MtG game. My only complaint at first glance is that I wish the White mana units were, well, white. But that’s nothing a little paint can’t fix. I’m waiting for a copy to review here at GeekDad HQ, so I can’t tell you how it plays yet; but in the meantime, I can give you a teaser of what’s in the box:

Image courtesy of Hasbro

Image courtesy of Hasbro

Components:

  • 6 modular board pieces
  • 4 plastic terrain pieces
  • 3 plastic glyphs
  • 2 temple ruins
  • 5 Painted Planeswalker Mini Figures
  • 30 Squad Mini Figures
  • One 20-sided die
  • 8 Combat dice
  • 30 Damage Counters
  • 60 spell cards
  • 10 Squad stat cards
  • 5 Planeswalker cards

If you love Magic: The Gathering and have been looking for a new way to bring the game to the table, or if you’re a fan who’s been wanting to branch out into new formats, like tactical miniature gaming, or maybe you just miss HeroScape, this is going to a great game to bring to the table this summer!

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My DC Comics Essentials http://geekdad.com/2015/07/dc-comics-essentials/ http://geekdad.com/2015/07/dc-comics-essentials/#comments Fri, 03 Jul 2015 12:30:01 +0000 http://geekdad.com/?p=100660 When DC Comics rebooted its universe a few years ago with an entirely new continuity called "The New 52," I took to calling it the anti-Corrina reboot because every decision made tended to be the exact opposite of what I wanted to read.

But now that DC has basically rebooted again, their universe looks different. Continue reading

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Jim Gordon finds a Bat-suit., copyright DC Comics

Jim Gordon finds a Bat-suit., copyright DC Comics

When DC Comics rebooted its universe a few years ago with an entirely new continuity called “The New 52,” I took to calling it the anti-Corrina reboot because every decision made tended to be the exact opposite of what I wanted to read.

But now that DC has basically rebooted again, their universe looks different. It’s not that they have new characters so much as they seem to have a commitment to greater creative freedom on various projects and that they’re taking chances on books that are way out there. Some will undoubtedly fail but it won’t be for lack of imagination or adherence to some top-down editorial command.

Yes, there are still problems with Superman, Wonder Woman, Green Lantern, and the Flash or Aquaman titles. Some of them are good–Aquaman–but none of them are great. Superman, for instance, is trapped in a horrible plotline about his secret identity being outed, which is messing with some great creative work. Wonder Woman’s book is just awful all-around.

Batman, as usual, is getting the best of everyone.

I did capsule reviews of week 2, week 3, and week four of the “new” #DCyou last month on GeekMom and I found a lot to love. But these were review copies. Which ones would I spend money on? Those are the starred ones. That’s not to say the others aren’t good but money is tight, there are a lot of great choices for comics (see: Image, Dynamite, Boom, Dark Horse and, yes, Marvel) and these are my DC essentials.

***Batman/Batman: Detective Comics, writers: Scott Snyder, Brian Buccellato, Francis Manapul, artists, Greg Capullo, Danny Miki and Fernando Blanco, 

I put these entries together as they’re part of the same overall story, although coming at the tale from different angles. Batman (Bruce Wayne version) is dead after an epic showdown with the Joker and Gotham’s powers-that-be decide that a Batman is still needed, though this one should be sanctioned by the authorities. Enter Jim Gordon as the man under a robot Batman suit, taking on the job as Gotham’s ultimate cop. So far, this idea succeeds beyond expectations, as Gordon’s unique voice as a cynical and down-to-earth detective is somewhat in conflict with his new job as someone that smashes things. As one of the world’s biggest Jim Gordon fans, I really can’t miss this story. One small problem: I miss Gordon’s mustache and glasses. (Yes, Bruce is coming back. We already see him alive in the first part of this storyline.)

Batgirl, written by Brenden Fletcher and Cameron Stewart, art by Babs Tarr

This series was given a soft reboot with the new creative team of Cameron Stewart, Brenden Fletcher and Babs Tarr last fall. I’m still not used to the younger, sillier Barbara Gordon but the art style is fun and imaginative, and that’s reason enough to pick up the book. Reason two is Babs herself, who seems to be finally relaxed in her new surroundings.

Black Canary & bandmates, art by Annie Wu, copyright DC Comics

Black Canary & bandmates, art by Annie Wu, copyright DC Comics

***Black Canary, written by Brenden Fletcher, art by Annie Wu

Yet another incarnation of Black Canary, this time as a rock star? I initially hated the idea, especially given that I’d spent years reading about Dinah Laurel Lance and this character is essentially brand new. Yet the first issue won me over, especially Annie Wu’s art, and with how each of her bandmates has a unique personality. That the story also brought out Canary’s protective side, always part of her personality, sold me on the series.

Constantine: The Hellblazer, written by James T. Tynion IV and Ming Doyle, art by Riley Rossmo

I’ve never read the original Vertigo series and after reading his appearances in the new 52, I didn’t find any reason to search them out. Enter this new series, which sold me on John in just the first two pages, as he enters a dry cleaner’s covered in blood and proceeds to be, well, a right bastard once it’s revealed the help an older lover needs is not what she says it is.

Doctor Fate, written by Paul Levitz, art by Sonny Liew

This Golden Age character has been many things but he’s never been a non-white guy before. That all changes with this issue, as the Helmet of Fate chooses a young medical student, Khalid, as its new bearer, while a battle between the forces of chaos and order rages in the form of a storm. I love the artwork and the indie-comic style touches like the text conversation between Khalid and his girlfriend. Note issue #2’s cover has Khalid trying to save an airplane about to crash, an image that has resonance, especially in New York City.

Gotham Academy, written by Brenden Fletcher and Becky Cloonan, various artists

Call it the Hogwarts of Gotham, the place where the elite (and twisted) of Gotham City send their children to, uh, learn, though mostly what they seem to be doing is getting into trouble and exploring the mysteries of the academy. This series is a great place to start for tweens new to Gotham.

Gotham by Midnight, written by Ray Fawkes, art by Ben Templesmith, Juan Ferreyra

More an independent horror comic than a Batman/Gotham comic, this supernatural department of Gotham’s police force, headed by the supernatural being known as the Spectre (well, his alter ego, Jim Corrigan), fights the evil and horrific hidden in the corners of Gotham.

Justice League of America, Bryan Hitch, writer and artist, various artists.

I include this title because it’s old-school Justice League storytelling, even beginning with classic banter between Lois and Clark at the Daily Planet, and a truly weird mystery about various Supermen from different universes who show up during a science “experiment” only to warn about something then die. The other reason? Bryan Hitch’s art.

Harley Quinn, written by Amanda Conner and Jimmy Palmiotti, art by Chad Hardin

The off-kilter, humorous, and yet somehow occasionally touching series features a woman, Harley Quinn, who’s a villain but really thinks she’s a hero. She’s the kind of person who saves all the dogs at the local pound but whose idea of proper doggie chow is the hit men who tried to kill her. At the moment, she’s recruited an army of Harleys to protect her neighborhood. I suspect it won’t turn out well but it certainly is fun to read.

Martian Manhunter, written by Rob Williams, art by Eber Ferreira and Eddy Barrows

I’m not sold on the premise of J’onn J’onzz being a sleeper agent for a Martian invasion but I’m sold on the story, which is twisty and imaginative, especially concerning a Martian “beggar” who is good to neighborhood children.

gay superhero

Midnighter #2, art by Aco, copyright DC Comics

***Midnighter, written by Steve Orlando, art by Aco

Yes, Midnighter is a character from DC’s now defunct Wildstorm universe and he’s an obvious Batman analogue. Forget all that or, better yet, if you’ve never read the character before, all you need to know is that this (anti)hero is part-computer cyborg, relentless, and yet lost emotionally because he truly has no real life or purpose save to battle the bad guys. This is why when he speed-dates, he reveals he’s a superhero. The first two issues were terrific, especially #2 in which he found a kindred spirit in a woman out to kill corrupt business owners. Oh, by the way, this is DC’s first solo gay male lead.

Prez, written by Mark Russell, art by Ben Caldwell

I include Prez because the first issue showed promised but it was also somewhat all over the place, with a little too many ideas thrown at the reader all at once, from Presidential elections now being decided on Twitter, to YouTube stars abusing Presidential candidates at will. This is a twisted dystopian future. I hope issue #2 settles down just a bit.

Secret Six #3 panel, copyright DC Comics

Secret Six #3 panel, art by Dale Eaglesham, copyright DC Comics

***Secret Six, written by Gail Simone, art by Dale Eaglesham

This series about the villains we love (yes, just love) featured an entire issue in which they questioned each other about who had weird sex on the couch, in which Catman saved a dog from an abusive owner, and we find out that no one knows how to cook, despite the group trying to fit into Gotham’s suburbs like a regular family. Oh, and the Riddler is secretly pulling their strings. Extra points: Catman is drawn so pretty.

Starfire #1 cover, copyright DC Comics

Starfire #1 cover, copyright DC Comics

***Starfire, written by Jimmy Palmiotti & Amanda Conner, art by Emanuela Lupacchino

More fun from Conner/Palmiotti as the alien Starfire decides she needs to know more about normal humans and settles into a seaside town just as a hurricane is about to hit. A seriously fun book that has a good time with how Starfire learns language (yes, she kisses people), her complete lack of shame about her naked body, her annoyance with those who are unkind, and her ability to make friends with the local constabulary. No character has benefited more from this new DC than Princess Koriand’r, and Lupacchino makes her attractive without oversexualizing her.

Duke Thomas

We are Robin #1, copyright DC Comics

***We Are Robin, written by Lee Bermejo, art by Jorge Corona, Rob Haynes, Khary Randolph

Told through the eyes of Duke Thomas, who helped Batman out previously, the first issue shows that Gotham needs more guardians than Batman, perhaps even colorful ones like Robins. Issue #1 was a great start as Duke searched for his parents and I’m eager to find out who the rest of the Robin squad are and who’s behind their formation. (Alfred?)

Just missed the cut: Grayson and Omega Men. With Grayson, I appreciate what the creative team is doing with this book and I especially love Mikel Janin’s art, but I’m just not feeling Dick Grayson as a spy.

With Omega Men, the first issue was somewhat difficult to follow, while the second was clearer and more intense. Something good is building there but the full shape is not apparent just yet.

Disclaimer: GeekDad received these comics as review items. 

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Kickstarter Tabletop Alert and Interview: Yan Egorov’s ‘Swords and Bagpipes’ http://geekdad.com/2015/07/swords-and-bagpipes/ http://geekdad.com/2015/07/swords-and-bagpipes/#comments Fri, 03 Jul 2015 12:00:56 +0000 http://geekdad.com/?p=100790 Freeeedom! As someone with a background in Scottish medieval history, 'Swords and Bagpipes' seemed like a game meant for me. Yan Egorov has made a great, fun game where you and your friends take on the role of Scottish lords trying to gain independence from England using might, strategy, and treachery. Continue reading

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SwordsBagpipes-FeaturedFreeeedom! As someone with a background in Scottish medieval history, Swords and Bagpipes seemed like a game meant for me. Yan Egorov has made a great, fun game where you and your friends take on the role of Scottish lords trying to gain independence from England using might, strategy, and treachery.

New to Kickstarter? Check out our crowdfunding primer.

Swords and Bagpipes is a tabletop game for two to six players that is a fun and novel twist on a game that is both cooperative and competitive. It just launched on Kickstarter and has already met its funding goal and unlocked its first stretch goal. Additional stretch goals will unlock even more game components and mechanics that I did not get to try. Also note that the game components in my photos are from a prototype and do not represent final quality.

At a very high level, Swords and Bagpipes sounds pretty simple. You and the other Scottish lords get seven battles (turns) to defeat the English. If Scotland survives until the end, everyone wins, but the lord with the most gold is the ultimate winner. If Scotland suffers four defeats, the game is over and everyone loses, but the lord with the fewest dagger cards is the winner of the losers. Yes, the victory conditions change based on how well you all cooperate with each other! This balance between betraying your countrymen to earn more gold and fighting for freedom is what makes this game so dynamic!

SwordsBagpipes-ContentsWhat’s in the box (base contents):

  • 1 game board
  • 1 rule book
  • 6 Camp sheets
  • 6 Castle sheets
  • 8 English Arms cards
  • 2 Kind Edward cards
  • 22 Bagpipe cards
  • 54 unit tokens
  • 60 gold coins
  • 6 pairs of choice tokens
  • 1 Stay Home! token
  • 1 Scotland’s Defeat marker

Game setup is really quick and simple. Place the Scotland’s Defeat marker at Glasgow to track Scotland’s losses. Create the English Arms deck by combining six random English Arms cards on top of one randomly selected King Edward card. These are the scenarios for each of the seven rounds. Each player receives a clan Castle and clan Camp sheet along with a pair of matching choice tokens. Each player starts with three units and three gold in their castle along with one Bagpipe card.

Each turn is made up of seven phases: Invasion, Actions, Badge of Honour, Choice, Battle, Awards, and End. This sounds like a lot of things to do but after the first round and learning all the options, the seven phases go pretty quickly.

The Invasion phase is when the English Arms card is flipped and the scenario for the round is set. Each scenario indicates four things–how many army units the English start with, the reward for Scotland supporters if Scotland wins the battle, the reward for Scotland supporters if Scotland loses the battle, and the reward for those who betray Scotland and side with England. Those who side with England will receive their reward regardless of battle outcome to represent that this was a payment for betrayal that the crown already paid to the lord.

During the Actions phase, each player can do any or all of the three available actions in any order. Relocation allows a player to move units from their Castle to their Camp. Only units in the Camp take part in the Battle phase. Playing Bagpipe cards allows a player to play as many Bagpipe cards with the axe symbol as they want. Replenishment allows a player to do one of four things–Collect Taxes to add a gold coin to their castle, Raise Militia to add one unit to every player’s camp including Scotland’s, Assemble Troops to add two units to your own Castle, or Hire Mercenaries to spend one gold to add four units to your Castle.

During the Badge of Honour phase, the player holding the Badge of Honour passes it to any player of his choice except for the person who previously passed it to him. Whoever holds the Badge of Honour during the Choice Phase cannot side with England.

The Choice Phase is where each player secretly chooses one of their choice tokens–for Scotland or for England–and places it face down before them. Any Bagpipe cards with the choice symbol can be played during this phase as well.

The Battle Phase begins with all players revealing their choice token. The strength of the Scottish Army is equal to the sum of the units in Scotland’s camp plus all of those in camps of players who sided with Scotland. The strength of the English Army is equal to the sum of the units on the English Arms card plus all of those in camps of players who sided with England. The higher number wins. In the event of a tie, Scotland gets the win since they are the underdog! If Scotland loses, the Scotland’s Defeat Marker moves to the next space on the board.

During the Awards phase, any players who had no units in their camp will receive no reward regardless of which side they choose, and they cannot play any Bagpipe cards. All other players are given their rewards–units, gold, Bagpipe cards, and Dagger cards–based on the English Arms scenario card. Any players who fought in the battle can play any Bagpipe cards with the Awards symbol on it.

The End phase just resets everything for the next round. Discard all units in Camps and in Scotland’s camp, and the person with the Badge of Honour begins the next round.

When either all seven rounds are completed or Scotland is defeated, the game ends. If Scotland was victorious, everybody wins because freedom is the best! All players count up their gold and the lord with most gold is the new leader of Scotland and is the ultimate winner. If there is a tie, then the lord with the fewest daggers wins. The exception to this is that if any lord has at least five dagger cards more than the next highest player, that lord is declared an enemy of Scotland and cannot win. Be careful how much you betray your country for riches!

If Scotland is defeated, all lords reveal their dagger cards. The lord who was the most loyal to Scotland (and has the lowest number of daggers) is the winner. If there is a tie for fewest daggers, then the player with the most gold wins. As you can see, there is a fine balancing act between getting gold, being loyal, and being traitorous.

SwordsBagpipes-PlayingWe play-tested the game twice during our GeekDad Father’s Day event, and we all had a blast with this game. We were playing the three-player variant which is essentially the same but without using the Badge of Honour. I can’t wait to try the game out with a larger group and with the newly added two-player variant.

[Editor’s Note: I got to try Swords and Bagpipes with Will at our GeekDad’s gaming event, and I think it’s a fascinating game. The core mechanic is based on the Prisoner’s Dilemma–you get the best outcome if you’re the only one who sides with England, but if everyone sides with England then you’ll probably lose. It’s definitely one I’d like to play some more, and learning a little about Scottish history is just a bonus. –Jonathan Liu]

While I wait patiently for the game to be backed and shipped, Yan Egorov was great enough to let me ask him some questions about the game and being a game maker.

GeekDad: I have a degree in History and specialized in medieval Scotland, so when I heard about your game, I was immediately hooked! How did you decide to make a game set during the Scottish Independence Wars?

Yan Egorov: Honestly, it was all because of the Braveheart movie. I was fooling around with a mechanic at that time and was choosing a setting. After a fair amount of thinking, I decided to go a simpler way and make a game about military politics. The Scottish Independence Wars are clearly the best pick not because of the war itself, but because of the country. A lot of people in Russia love Scotland!

GD: Since a lot of our readers are parents, what do you think is the right age range for Swords and Bagpipes?

YE: Well, the theme of the Wars is suitable for all ages. There is no blood and gore in the game. Everybody is nice and cute. But younger kids can’t really get the concept of the in-game betrayal. If your child is ok with that and can understand Settlers of Catan level rules, than he/she can surely play Swords and Bagpipes. I suppose the age rating is about 10+.

GD: When and how did you first get into gaming?

YE: At the University. I hung out with the bunch of geeks. Most of the time we played really hardcore stuff like D&D and Twilight Imperium. Now we are too old for that and play much “softer” boardgames.

GD: A lot of us gaming geeks dream of creating our own games. I know I have several ideas bouncing around in my head at any given moment that I’d love to see in the real world. How did you get into creating games and do you have any tips on where people can get started?

YE: Well, I started because of a game design contest with a $1,000 prize. I advise people to find some kind of boardgame-design community in their hometowns. You don’t need Knizia-famous people. All creators are going through the same stages. There are a lot of simple truths that you can get from authors of one or two published boardgames.

GD: Do you make games full-time or do you have another job as well?

YE: I work in the game-dev industry, PC and mobile, so my hobby and my job are kind of related.

GD: Something along the lines of “Being a geek isn’t about what you love but how you love it,” is sort of the new geek mantra. Do you have anything, besides gaming, that you consider yourself a geek about?

SwordsBagpipes-YanYE: I’m a re-enactor. I think that’s a rather geeky way of spending your free time. I don’t possess the perfect knowledge of history, but I am one of the top dance re-enactors in Russia. And my weapon fighting skills are all right too.

GD: This is probably a bit premature since you’re right in the thick of it with Swords and Bagpipes but do you have any other game ideas or Kickstarter projects in the works you can talk about?

YE: Of course! Good ideas are in the air. But it’s unlikely that I will get to anything else until I publish Swords and Bagpipes.

For more details on the game, the campaign and some gameplay videos, head over to Kickstarter! You won’t regret grabbing a copy of this game.

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Paper Cut: Replacing Paper With the Boogie Board http://geekdad.com/2015/07/boogie-board/ http://geekdad.com/2015/07/boogie-board/#comments Fri, 03 Jul 2015 11:30:48 +0000 http://geekdad.com/?p=100773 We use a lot of scrap paper: my wife writes notes for the kids before she leaves for work in the morning; I'll grab paper to jot down a correct spelling or help my kids work out a math problem; my kids doodle constantly and their drawings accumulate around the house like fallen leaves, eventually to be scooped up and tossed into the recycling bin. While I doubt I'll ever be a totally paperless house, the Boogie Board can replace at least some of those uses. Continue reading

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Boogie Boards

Boogie Boards: Sync 9.7 and Jot 4.5. Photo: Jonathan H. Liu

We use a lot of scrap paper: my wife writes notes for the kids before she leaves for work in the morning; I’ll grab paper to jot down a correct spelling or help my kids work out a math problem; my kids doodle constantly and their drawings accumulate around the house like fallen leaves, eventually to be scooped up and tossed into the recycling bin. While I doubt I’ll ever be a totally paperless house, the Boogie Board can replace at least some of those uses.

I was recently sent two versions of the Boogie Board to try out: the Jot 4.5 and the Sync 9.7. The Boogie Board is a pressure-sensitive LCD screen that you write on with a stylus (or any other hard object, really). The lines are light greenish-grey against the black screen, and pressing a button clears the screen to black again. It reminds me a little of those Magic Slate boards I had as a kid–you drew on them with a stylus, and then lifted the clear plastic sheet to erase them.

Boogie Board Jot

My toddler immediately decided the Jot was hers. Photo: Jonathan H. Liu

The Jot is pocket-sized (for a large pocket), with a 4.5″ diagonal screen. The stylus clips onto the side, and can also be put through the hole in a corner to stand it up, though I’m not entirely sure how useful that is if you’re planning to write on it. What’s great about this, though, is that my toddler can draw, clear the screen, and draw some more, without needing to get more paper. Both of my older girls loved playing with it, too, and it’s small enough that I can have grab it to have in the car for a short drive.

The Jot has a plastic cover that fits over the front, covering the screen and the button–however, I found that if you press hard, it will still activate the button and erase it. I thought about using the Jot for my grocery list rather than the notepad on the fridge, but the possibility of erasing the list before I was done shopping worries me. The shape of the lid also looks like it should fit on the back of the Jot to store it while you’re drawing, but it doesn’t quite–it bends the Jot backward–so I’ve mostly given up on the cover and just use the Jot without it.

Boogie Board drawing

My older daughters take turns drawing on the Jot (when the toddler isn’t around). Photo: Jonathan H. Liu

My wife leaves notes for the kids before she leaves for work in the morning, and usually she uses a small notepad we keep in the kitchen. Lately, she’ll use the Jot instead (if she can find it), since the notes usually get recycled after the kids read them … after the scraps of paper fall on the floor and lay there for a day or so. Now, they can read them and hit the button to erase them. (Not as exciting as Chief Quimby’s self-destructing messages, but less messy.) The Jot’s battery is non-replaceable, but the packaging claims you can use it about 50,000 times before it runs out.

The Sync is a larger board (about 9.7″ diagonal screen, thus the name) and works the same way, but with an extra feature: Bluetooth connectivity. It allows you to connect the Sync to a smartphone, tablet, or computer. You can hit the “save” button to store drawings and notes, which can be downloaded later. If you have the app running, you can see the drawings on-screen as you scribble on the Sync.

Boogie Board Sync

The Sync app lets you save notes and drawings from the Boogie Board. Photo: Jonathan H. Liu

You can also set up the Sync as a digitizer to use it as a simple pen and tablet for your computer. In this case, the board maps to the entire screen rather than just the app window, and the rocker button on the stylus acts as a right click. (Tapping is a left click.)

Boogie Board stylus

The stylus fits into a hole in the side of the Sync. Photo: Jonathan H. Liu

The Sync has a power button since it needs to use battery power to be connected, and charges with microUSB, though I’ve gone a significant length of time without needing to charge it. You can draw on it with the power off, but you need to power it up to erase the screen or save notes. The stylus fits into a notch on the side of the Sync but I found that to be a little weird–there’s basically a thin plastic bridge that holds the stylus in place. The stylus itself is fine–just a light, thin pen-shaped plastic with a rocker button near the front. There’s a piece that looks like a clip on the back end, but it’s just a solid piece; it keeps the stylus from rolling away, but doesn’t seem to serve any other purpose.

Both the Sync and Jot are pressure-sensitive, making thicker lines as you press harder on the screen. However, I did notice by looking at the saved drawings on my computer that the Sync doesn’t seem to register the lighter marks. Probably there’s a minimum threshold you have to reach, so if you’re taking notes that you really need to save, you should press a little harder.

The Jot 4.5 retails for $14.99 and the Sync 9.7 retails for $99.99. There are a few other models available as well, which you can see at the Boogie Board website. If you’re looking for a replacement for all the little scraps of paper and sticky notes you leave around the house, the Boogie Board might be a nice replacement. If you can get it away from your kids.

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Workout Smart! Workout Ssmart Dynamo 2+! http://geekdad.com/2015/07/ssmart-dynamo-review/ http://geekdad.com/2015/07/ssmart-dynamo-review/#comments Fri, 03 Jul 2015 11:00:14 +0000 http://geekdad.com/?p=97781 As a running geek, I love gadgets and tech, especially when they help me gather and analyze data related to fitness. The Ssmart Dynamo 2+ from Oregon Scientific is a great new activity tracker that's helping me up my game. Continue reading

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SsmartDynamo-FeaturedAs a running geek, I love gadgets and tech, especially when they help me gather and analyze data related to fitness. The Ssmart Dynamo 2+ from Oregon Scientific is a great new activity tracker that’s helping me up my game.

Although I use a Garmin Forerunner 220 when I’m running, it’s not really an everyday use activity tracker, so I have a Fitbit Zip for my everyday tracking. While the Zip has been great for basic daily activity tracking, I’ve had to supplement it with a sleep tracking app to also track my sleep. Enter the Ssmart Dynamo 2+ with everything I wanted and then some.

I don’t usually wear a watch so one nice thing about the Dynamo is that the device actually comes out of the wristband and can be tossed in your pocket. However, I tend to lose things from my pocket, so I’ve only been using it as an on wrist device. The design of the wrist band and the device is very clean and unobtrusive to the point that I hardly notice it’s there except for when it is notifying me.

So what all does the Dynamo track? The Dynamo keeps track of you Active Minutes, Steps, Distance, Calories, and Sleep. You can also set goals for each one of these metrics and the Dynamo will prod you or congratulate you throughout the day, based on how poorly or well you are doing. My Fitbit Zip does these things as well minus the sleep tracking but without the reminders which are nice.

SsmartDynamo-TutorialThe Ssmart Fit app is really where the magic happens. When you first sync your device, the app gives you a nice walk through of all the device’s features and how to use them. Having the app walk me through all the features was a nice touch versus having to read a manual.

SsmartDynamo-TrackThe Ssmart Fit app also gives you a great, quick iconic view of how you’re doing as well as a more detailed view by the numbers. You can also see a chart for each metric across the day.

And now for the bonus feature I didn’t even know that I wanted – notifications. Because the Dynamo 2+ syncs with your smart device for the app to collect and report data, it also receives notifications from most, if not all, of your apps–text messages, phone calls, Fallout Shelter, you name it–and displays them on the device. It’s been really nice just quickly glancing at my wrist and deciding whether I need to bother picking up my phone. I haven’t really been keen on picking up a smart watch and this has definitely quenched any thirst I had for one.

SsmartDynamo-ChargeThe one downside I’ve found compared to my Fitbit Zip is that the Ssmart needs to be plugged in to charge versus having an onboard standard battery. I would expect that from a more fully featured device like this, but it does take some getting used to.

With so many devices on the market that do it all, I’ve been looking to upgrade.The most comparable devices in the Fitbit line are the Fitbit Charge and the Fitbit Charge HR. But they both cost more than the Ssmart Dynamo 2+ and while the Charge HR has one up on the Dynamo due to continuous heart rate monitoring, the Dynamo 2+ has smart device notifications which pushes it way ahead of the Charge HR in my mind. So if, like me, you want all the features of a Charge plus some of the functionality of an Apple Watch but without breaking the bank, check out the Ssmart Dynamo 2+!

Note: I received a device for review purposes but all thoughts and opinions above are my own.

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9 Great New Gadget Kickstarter Projects This Week http://geekdad.com/2015/07/new-gadget-kickstarter-projects/ http://geekdad.com/2015/07/new-gadget-kickstarter-projects/#comments Fri, 03 Jul 2015 10:30:42 +0000 http://geekdad.com/?p=100764 VR cameras, Arduino shields, and more great new gadget projects for you to back this week! Continue reading

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PROJECTS
camera

Sphericam 2, the 4K 360º Video Camera for Virtual Reality
This slick camera has come a long way from its 2012 version.

olloclip Studio: an integrated Mobile Photography System
Four years after its Kickstarter debut, Olloclip is back with fun new gear.

Plot, Airbrush, Laser, Dispense. Tooli the creative CNC tool
A wider range of creative options than your standard CNC device.

tobyrich.vegas: Gaming Drones for Dogfights, Races & Stunts
For drone battles high over your town or across the office.

HamShield for Arduino (VHF/UHF transceiver)
Transmit voice and data over amateur radio bands.

Naturebytes Wildlife Cam Kit – Digital Making for Wildlife
Build your own Raspberry Pi-powered wildlife camera.

Bring back the legendary Trioplan soap bubble bokeh f2.8/100
Kickstarter’s a great place to resurrect weird old camera lenses.

The Wabash Lights – The Beta Test
An app will let anyone control LED lights under Chicago’s elevated tracks.

Cinnamon II The Ultimate Retro Smartwatch
An “Apple ][ compatible” watch with 32k of memory and a 1 Mhz CPU.

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Daily #DadJoke for July 03, 2015 http://geekdad.com/2015/07/dadjoke-070315/ http://geekdad.com/2015/07/dadjoke-070315/#comments Fri, 03 Jul 2015 10:00:14 +0000 http://geekdad.com/?p=100019 Past and present walked together into a bar... Continue reading

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Daily #DadJoke for July 03, 2015:

20150703Past and present walked together into a bar.

It was pretty tense.


Have a great joke that you would like to see in print (complete with a “submitted by your name here” shout-out)? Send it in to GeekDadJokes!

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Today’s ‘TableTop’ Episode Is ‘Legendary’ http://geekdad.com/2015/07/tabletop-legendary/ http://geekdad.com/2015/07/tabletop-legendary/#comments Thu, 02 Jul 2015 21:00:01 +0000 http://geekdad.com/?p=100792 Today's episode of TableTop is about one of my favorite games: Legendary, a cooperative deck-building game set in the Marvel universe. It features Allie Brosh, Mark Fischbach, and Brea Grant along with host Wil Wheaton as they take on the Red Skull and his nefarious scheme. Continue reading

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Today’s episode of TableTop is about one of my favorite games: Legendary, a cooperative deck-building game set in the Marvel universe. It features Allie Brosh, Mark Fischbach, and Brea Grant along with host Wil Wheaton as they take on the Red Skull and his nefarious scheme.

Playing in the Marvel universe lets everyone gush about their favorite characters. Wil is partial to Deadpool, Allie is all about the Hulk Smash, and Brea builds up her tech with Iron Man. And Mark? Well, he seems to have a thing for Maria Hill.

The team plays Legendary in semi-cooperative mode: you work together to take down the mastermind, but then you get to count up points at the end to see who was the MVP. Will they stop Red Skull, or will his scheme twists defeat them? Will Hawkeye prove useful to the team? Will Mark’s economic strategy pay off in the end? Watch the episode to find out.

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5x Video and 5x Tabletop – New Kickstarter Game Projects This Week http://geekdad.com/2015/07/new-kickstarter-game-projects/ http://geekdad.com/2015/07/new-kickstarter-game-projects/#comments Thu, 02 Jul 2015 17:39:15 +0000 http://geekdad.com/?p=100756 Kickstarter is a great source for new games, both tabletop and videogames. Here are 5 more of each that have hit this week. Check them out! Continue reading

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VIDEO GAMES

renoirRENOIR
A crime drama drenched in film-noir atmosphere.

V.Next
Cyberpunk game that will be released in 18 weekly episodes.

Spellsworn
Sling spells at other wizards in this online PvP arena.

At the Mountains of Madness
Spanish duo takes a maximalist approach to Lovecraft’s cosmic horror tale.

Inverted
Black on white, white on black — invert the maze to win.

TABLETOP GAMES
emojiEmoji Cards – The World’s Very First Emoji Card Game
Inevitable! Like Charades, but you communicate with emoji.

14 Days: A game about life with migraines
Stepping into the shoes of a person suffering from chronic pain.

Nuclear War Card Game 50th Anniversary Edition
Bathe in Cold War nostalgia with this piece of gaming history.

Monikers: Shmonikers
Whoops, we almost missed this expansion for the hit party game.

Swords and Bagpipes
You don’t have to wear a kilt while you play this, but it might help.

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GeekDad Daily Deals: Rage Water-Resistant Bluetooth Speaker http://geekdad.com/2015/07/rage-water-resistant-bluetooth-speaker/ http://geekdad.com/2015/07/rage-water-resistant-bluetooth-speaker/#comments Thu, 02 Jul 2015 17:20:36 +0000 http://geekdad.com/?p=100732 Enjoy tunes by the pool with the Rage Water-Resistant Bluetooth Speaker: 30% off today Continue reading

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Rage Water-Resistant Bluetooth Speaker

Always have your music playing with today’s Daily Deal, the Rage Water-Resistant Bluetooth Speaker. Durable and lightweight this portable speaker gives you up to four hours of sound per charge. Take it with you anywhere you go. Click the link above to see details.

Be sure to check GeekDad’s section called Daily Deals. Each weekday we will offer new deals on cool stuff. These deals have limited lifespans, so keep checking back. Also, create an account and sign up for our newsletter at https://deals.geekdad.com/sign_up or follow our Store RSS Feed at https://deals.geekdad.com/feed.

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MegaBots Challenges Japan’s Kuratas to a Duel of Mechs http://geekdad.com/2015/07/megabots/ http://geekdad.com/2015/07/megabots/#comments Thu, 02 Jul 2015 14:00:56 +0000 http://geekdad.com/?p=100658 MegaBots Incorporated, a company based in the United States, has challenged Japanese company Suidobashi Heavy Industry to a battle of mechs. Continue reading

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MegaBots Incorporated, a company based in the United States, has challenged Japanese company Suidobashi Heavy Industry to a battle of mechs. What could possibly go wrong? Just like cloning dinosaurs, human-crewed mechs might not be a the best idea, but it’s simply something we, as a species, must do.

The Megabot Mark 2 is not the first fully functional mech. Suidobashi Heavy Industry’s Kuratas, armed with twin gatling guns is a formidable opponent. Will they accept the challenge? We can only hope.

From MegaBot’s website.

Prepare yourself for a new sport. Two-person teams working together to pilot these robots from the inside, high speed projectiles flying around a giant playing field at top speed, robot limbs and armor plating littering the ground after a match.

The sport of the future is here, and it’s straight out of science fiction.

Hopefully they’ve worked out the overheating issue with these Mecha. While I fully support this new sport, I’m kind of holding out for mechs vs. cloned dinosaurs.

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